Feline Fostering

When mother cats with babies of any age arrive at NHHS, they are immediately checked by our staff veterinarian. In most cases, these homeless families need a place to land until the kittens are old enough to be adopted per state law. Kittens cannot be sold or given away under the age of 8 weeks. We adhere to that statute.

In order to provide for these kittens and nursing feline mothers, we need a strong cadre of foster homes ready and able to take these creatures into their homes.

The following are requirements for those considering fostering:

  • Own your own home, or have written approval from your landlord that you may foster.
  • You must be at least 21 years of age.
  • In order to provide the rehabilitative care you need to be home enough hours of the day and evening to provide care and affection.
  • Your home must be safe, warm or cool as appropriate to the season and escape proof.
  • Foster family must not come into contact with your pets.
  • Your pets must be current on their vaccinations.
  • Children MUST be supervised at all times when handling foster animals.
  • Have on hand quality food necessary to feed the animals.
  • Provide clean bedding and living space at all times, no romping in their own "by-products".
  • Knowledge of the health and wellness needs of kittens and possibly nursing mothers.
  • Submit to a home inspection.
  • Complete an orientation and safe handling class at the shelter (held monthly).

Canine Fostering

Generally there are three reasons to place a dog or puppy in foster care:

  • Health - recovering from surgery or medical treatment.
  • Behavioral - dog needs some rehabilitative care in a home environment. We NEVER place aggressive dogs in foster care; their needs are addressed in-house with NHHS Staff handling them.
  • Hospice or Respite placement - perhaps the dog is old, has stayed with us a very long time and simply needs to be away from the very stressful shelter environment for a period of time. Hospice homes can be long term.

Canine fostering is much more time intensive. You must first realistically consider if you:

  • Can truly commit to a minimum of four - six weeks fostering in your home for the dog in question.
  • Have the right stuff to take a dog into your home.
  • Can give the time and care necessary to meet the needs of the dog.

The following are requirements for those considering fostering:

  • Own your own home, or have written approval from your landlord that you may foster.
  • You must be at least 21 years of age.
  • In order to provide the rehabilitative care you need to be home enough hours of the day and evening to provide care and affection.
  • Your home must be safe, warm or cool as appropriate to the season and escape proof.
  • Fenced yard.
  • Foster family must not come into contact with your pets.
  • Your pets must be current on their vaccinations.
  • Children MUST be supervised at all times when handling foster animals. Never left alone with them. It is completely inappropriate and unsafe to leave your children alone with a foster dog, or have your children reprimand a foster dog.
  • Have on hand quality food necessary to feed the animals.
  • Provide clean bedding and living space at all times, no romping in their own "by-products".
  • Knowledge of the health and wellness needs of puppies and possibly nursing mothers.
  • Submit to a home inspection.
  • Complete an orientation and safe handling class at the shelter (held monthly).

Apply Today

If you can say "Yes" to all of these stipulations, complete a Foster Home Application.

Download Application

How the Process Works

Upon receipt of your completed form and application you will be contacted by a staff member for a phone interview. At that time it will be established if you fit our criteria and a home check arranged prior to placement of your first animal family. You will receive a list of contacts to call if you have any questions or problems.

Your first year of foster service precludes you from adopting any of the felines. We have found out the hard way that allowing first year foster homes to adopt nearly always results in them no longer being active in the program .

If you are ready to take on the challenge of helping homeless cats and dogs, puppies and kittens, then please email Lauren Richard.